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The highly successful deputy managing director of 'Future Women' schedules time for rest in her diary.

| By Rachael Thompson | Wellness

Gender Rights Advocate Jamila Rizvi on Juggling Her Career, Motherhood, and Self-Care

The highly successful deputy managing director of 'Future Women' schedules time for rest in her diary.

Welcome to Bedtime Stories, an interview series where we ask inspiring individuals to share their nighttime routine and sleep secrets. For this instalment, Jamila Rizvi shares the morning and night rituals that support her multifaceted working life.

Gender rights advocate, author, mother, journalist, board member, podcaster, public speaker, and media commentator. Jamila Rizvi’s list of accolades is nothing short of awe-inspiring. The Canberra-born leader has always had a deep sense of fairness and believed in the right of everyone to belong. “My parents instilled this in me as a kid and I think it’s evident in the work I do now,” she shares with Bed Threads Journal.

Prior to entering the media, Jamila worked in politics as an advisor to the Rudd and Gillard governments, advising on issues including employment, women, media, child care, and youth affairs. Following this she joined women's media group, Mamamia, ultimately becoming the brand’s editor-in-chief.

Fast forward to now and she is a columnist at The Sydney Morning Herald and the deputy managing director of Future Women, an organisation committed to making gender equality a reality at work. Her work for Future Women involves supporting governments and employer organisations working towards gender equality. “Through the Future Women Jobs Academy, I’m really proud to work alongside women who face barriers returning to work, to help them gain employment. Being able to do paid work, and earn a fair wage is essential to gender equality, as well as to securing women’s collective economic security.”

Jamila has had five books published by Penguin Random House including ​the​ bestselling Not Just Lucky; a career manifesto for millennial women, and The Motherhood; an anthology of letters about life with a newborn.

In 2017, Jamila was diagnosed with a brain tumour that can’t be fully removed. As a result, self-care is highly important in her day-to-day life, and something she says looks different to your average person in their 30s. In response to her health condition, Jamila proudly serves as a board member of the Royal Melbourne Hospital Neuroscience Foundation.

Balancing a successful career, motherhood, and finding time for self-care is no mean feat, so we spoke to Jamila about how she navigates all three and the morning and nighttime routines that support her busy life.

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