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The painter’s latest print collection in collaboration with astrologist Meghan Rose is inspired by the twelve signs of the zodiac.

| By Antonia Day | Journal

Behind the Mystical Works of LA-Based Artist Meagan Boyd

The painter’s latest print collection in collaboration with astrologist Meghan Rose is inspired by the twelve signs of the zodiac.

The one thing Meagan Boyd can't work without? "Poetry."

The LA-based artist, known for her ability to merge the sacred and earthly realms in her work, is one of our all-time favourite creatives – so you can imagine our excitement when she agreed to collaborate with us on a series of prints, based on the twelve signs of the zodiac.

As with all of Meagan's pieces, these works are a masterclass in colour and geometry, while mediating on ancient archetypes. Describing her style as “mythic and primitive while also being futuristic and deeply connected to a utopian vision for nature and humanity,” Meagan’s ethereal pieces speak to the collective unconscious.

Enchanting and dream-like, each time you look at these magical creations, you'll notice another detail that will spark your imagination. This, perhaps, is the beauty of Meagan's work.

To celebrate the launch of this collection, Meagan generously welcomed us into her studio, and we sat down with her to speak about her practice, inspiration, how she manages moments of self-doubt, and how she navigates her creative process while being a single parent.

Shop the Meagan Boyd x Meghan Rose x Bed Threads print collection here.

Hi Meagan! We're so excited about this new zodiac-inspired print collection for Bed Threads. What inspired you when creating this series?

I’ve been studying astrology for about 20 years so it was such a treat to incorporate my collected wisdom of the signs.

The inspiration was pulled from many different sources. I looked at the tarot, and whipped out a bunch of books from the Library of Esoterica to get inspired by the visual mythology of each sign. I was also looking at a lot of stills from Fantasia which I watched a lot as a child. There are so many mythic references in that film that were great for this project.

Tell us how your art relates to your sense of self.

I’ve definitely always been the person who dances to my own rhythm and I move through life in a way that pushes the boundary of the status quo. I’m a rebel at heart, but with a cause and a deep sense of purpose. I’m playful, tender, and romantic at times and I think that comes through in my work. I have my own way of doing things that I worked really hard to embrace about myself and I think most artists have to figure out their own unique way of expressing their vision which I think is really filtered through the lens of their unique personality.

How would you describe your style?

I would describe my art style as being mythic and primitive while also being futuristic and deeply connected to a utopian vision for nature and humanity. I work very intuitively and often don’t really draw on the canvas at all, I only use a roughly sketched reference and look at images a lot from books, often working from several different points of reference. I think those elements of my process come through in the finished pieces as well.

What does your average workday look like?

When I’m being gentle with myself and in alignment with the way I work best, I’m in the studio painting for maybe 4-5 hours, listening to an audiobook or podcast, and sometimes rocking out to music. I usually give myself time to rest or take a siesta in the afternoon. This is usually on a day that my 6-year-old daughter is at school.

I’m a single mum, so sometimes, if I have a deadline, that could mean I’m painting all day from the moment I wake till I go to sleep, with my daughter by my side. I also will sometimes get on a roll with an idea and paint all day. But different projects can bring up different ways of working.

What do you love most about working in your studio?

I love the freedom of painting. Knowing I can create anything I want on a canvas in such an automatic and visceral way is so liberating. I also enjoy the solitude and communion with the source required of painters. I like being in my own world I guess, and being a painter permits me to enter that realm regularly.

What motivates you to create?

It’s a difficult thing to describe, but I call it the creative urge. I think most people have the creative urge to a certain degree, but artists have such a strong urge that forces them to act on the urge consistently. It’s like a hunger that can only be nourished by making things and exploring.

What is one artist tool you can’t live without?

Poetry.

Who are your biggest artistic influences?

Most of my favourite artists were born over 100 years ago: Leonor Fini, Henri Matisse, William Blake, Frida Kahlo, and Marc Chagall – to name a few.

Talk us through your creative process. Where do you start?

I start with visionary meditation. I kind of look into myself to find the initial idea or vision to work with and build from there. Sometimes that involves sketching or reading or sometimes a flip through a book or Google image search.

After I get grounded in the idea for a piece, I start by priming the canvas and diving in as soon as that has dried. I work intuitively with all of the visual information I've gathered from my initial starting point and give myself more room to let it evolve in the paint. Usually, I think a painting is done, but I’ll need to sit with it for about a week before I can know for sure. There are always areas I want to change or elaborate once I've taken some space from a painting.

What has been the biggest challenge in your career so far?

I think it's been a challenge balancing being a single parent without consistent or reliable support from a second parent, but I think I might be someone who thrives in chaos. I don’t always enjoy this about myself. I wish it was easier, but against all odds, I have a very fulfilling career that lets me be myself even if who I am is so fundamentally different from most of society.

I think part of my purpose is showing people there are other ways of doing things and when you act from the heart space anything is possible! I love my daughter, and I love my work. I show up for them no matter what and they continue to guide and nourish me, in turn bringing in more prosperity, peace, and abundance. You get what you give and if you’re giving your all from a place of love, the gifts will be bountiful.

How do you balance the business side of being an artist with your creative work?

I just see these things as being intertwined. I’m passionate about my work so I try to be grateful for the things that arise from my creativity. I have known from a very young age that this is all I can do. I’m an awful employee, but I can be very savvy when it comes to working for myself. I know part of my gifts from the universe is getting to do my art for a living so I honour that by trying my best to be practical when it comes to business because it supports my livelihood.

At one point I decided to hire an assistant, and that has been profoundly helpful because I needed the extra support on the business end, which has actually helped me let go a bit and surrender to the playful side of being an artist. But initially, I had to learn how to do everything on my own.

How do you handle creative blocks or moments of self-doubt?

I honestly think I broke through this threshold a few years back when it comes to my work. It helps to not compare myself to others, because I've noticed this seems to be one of my only triggers. I’ve developed a deep sense of trust in myself by simply doing the work!

I've surprised myself many times when I’ve encountered situations I thought seemed impossible and come out on the other side learning something. Finding out what we are capable of in times of strife is so empowering. Knowing who you are, and remembering who the hell you are in these times is so healing.

Can you share any upcoming projects or ideas you're excited about?

There is an oracle deck I’ve illustrated that will be coming out this year which I’m very excited about, but I can’t say much more about this project at the moment. A lot of potential has entered my field and I might be travelling for a residency, and for workshops, but I will let these things reveal themselves when the time is right.

What do you hope to make people feel when they see your work?

I hope it brings a deep sense of joy and connection to the cosmos. I hope it inspires play, tickles the imagination, and offers poetic insight into what it means to be human. I hope it helps people remember that we are all interconnected to each other, nature, and the cosmos, and that it makes the world a more peaceful place.

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